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Hotel Guide for Edinburgh

Parts of the city - Edinburgh United Kingdom


Parts of the city - Edinburgh

Areas of the centre:The historic centre of Edinburgh is divided into two by the broad green swath of Princes Street Gardens. To the south the view is dominated by Edinburgh Castle, perched atop the extinct volcanic crag, and the long sweep of the Old Town trailing after it along the ridge. To the north lies Princes Street and the New Town. To the immediate west of the castle lies the financial district, housing insurance and banking buildings.

Old Town: The Old Town has preserved its medieval plan and many Reformation-era buildings. One end is closed by the castle and the main artery, the Royal Mile, leads away from it; minor streets lead downhill on either side of the main spine in a herringbone pattern. Only 10 minutes' walking from the Royal Mile, visitors to Edinburgh can find one of the most elegant and appreciated hotels of the city: it is the Crowne Plaza at 18 Royal Terrace, today part of an old Georgian building. Other notable places of interest nearby include the Royal Museum of Scotland, Surgeons' Hall and the University of Edinburgh.

New TownThe New Town was an 18th century solution to the problem of overcrowding in the Old Town. The city of Edinburgh had remained incredibly compact, confined to the ridge running down from the castle. In 1766 a competition to design the New Town was won by James Craig. The plan that was built created a rigid, ordered grid, which fitted well with enlightenment ideas of rationality. The principal street was to be George Street, which follows the natural ridge to the north of the Old Town. Either side of it are the other main streets of Princes Street and Queen Street. Princes Street has since become the main shopping street in Edinburgh.

In the mid-19th century the National Gallery of Scotland and Royal Scottish Academy Building were built on The Mound, and tunnels to Waverley Station driven through it. Today the New Town is considered by many to be one of the finest examples of Georgian architecture and planning in the world.


Hotel-Frederick House Edinburgh